JEDII Tech News: April 28

Links from around the web

Op-Ed: End the City’s ShotSpotter Contract

By Freddy Martinez on South Side Weekly (southsideweekly.com)

Surveillance technologies are destroying lives in Chicago

Schools Use Software That Blocks LGBTQ+ Content, But Not White Supremacists

By Todd Feathers on vice.com

A Motherboard investigation found the algorithmic surveillance tools allow racist groups like the KKK while flagging LGBTQ health sites as ‘porn’.

Covid-19 surveillance in Kenya and Uganda is reducing people’s rights.

on ARTICLE 19 (article19.org)

ARTICLE 19’s latest report examines how increased surveillance during Covid-19 has reduced rights for people across Kenya and Uganda.

The Ola & Uber judgments: for the first time a court recognises a GDPR right to an explanation for algorithmic decision-making

By Steve Peers on EU Law Analysis (eulawanalysis.blogspot.com)

Raphaël Gellert, Marvin van Bekkum, and Frederik Zuiderveen Borgesius - Dr. Gellert is assistant professor of law, at the iHub, Radb...

Doubling down on accessibility: Microsoft’s next steps to expand accessibility in technology, the workforce and workplace

By Brad Smith - President on The Official Microsoft Blog (blogs.microsoft.com)

More than 1 billion people around the world live with a disability, and at some point, most of us likely will face some type of temporary, situational or permanent disability. The practical impacts are huge.

Why COVID-19 vaccine “passports” threaten human rights

on Access Now (accessnow.org)

Governments are clamoring to explore digital COVID-19 vaccine “passports.” Current proposals, however, threaten human rights.

Q&A: The battle over face surveillance is about to heat up

By Evan Selinger on The Boston Globe (bostonglobe.com)

The rapid expansion of facial recognition technology could unlock a dystopian future. A leading activist argues that the only solution is to ban it.

Facebook allows advertisers to target children interested in smoking, alcohol and weight loss

By Josh Taylor on The Guardian (theguardian.com)

Social media giant gave organisation behind a page for Australian 13- to 17-year-olds option to run alcohol, smoking and gambling ads for as little as $3

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